This website is archived for historical purposes and is no longer being maintained or updated. For updated information on the current flu season, see the IDPH Seasonal Flu website.

Swine Flu

School H1N1 Flu Home

 

School-Located H1N1 Influenza Vaccination: Related Materials - CDC

Preparing for the Flu: A Communication Toolkit for Schools (Grades K-12) - PDF

Preparing for the Flu: A Communication Toolkit for Institutions of Higher Education - PDF

Questions and Answers about the CDC’s Guidance for Responses to Influenza for Institutions of Higher Education during the 2009-2010 Academic Year. - CDC

School-Located Vaccination Planning Materials and Templates - CDC

Germ Warfare - by Brad Tassell Brad Tassell, author of Don't Feed The Bully has written Germ Warfare. His book, Don't Feed The Bully is an award winning book read in hundreds of schools. Germ Warfare is written for middle-school and high-school students and informs them about the H1N1 flu and seasonal flu and how to prevent the spread of the virus. The book is illustrated by Tracey Tellez. Download a printable copy for yourself or for your class.

The Illinois Department of Public Health reminds schools that novel influenza is a reportable illness.

Please report the following situations to your local health department for further follow-up:

  1. Absenteeism beyond what would be expected at this time of year at your school
  2. Febrile respiratory illness (see below) beyond what would be expected at this time of year at your school

Definitions of Respiratory Illness

Febrile respiratory illness
Fever or feverishness and recent onset of at least one of the following:

  1. rhinorrhea or nasal congestion
  2. sore throat
  3. cough

School Dismissal and Child Care Facility Closure

CDC no longer recommends that communities with a laboratory-confirmed case of influenza A H1N1 consider adopting school dismissal or childcare closure measures. Rather, CDC has modified its policy to recommend implementation of measures that focus on keeping all student, faculty and staff with symptoms of influenza out of schools and childcare facilities during their period of illness and recuperation, when they are potentially infectious to others.

K-12 Schools

CDC Guidance for State and Local Public Health Officials and School Administrators for School (K-12) Responses to Influenza during the 2009-2010 School Year - CDC

Technical Report for State and Local Public Health Officials and School Administrators on CDC Guidance for School (K-12) Responses to Influenza during the 2009-2010 School Year - CDC

Recommendations for Infection Control in School Settings

Parents should be advised to keep their children home if they become sick with flu-like symptoms and to notify their school principal of the child’s absence. Parents should contact their health care providers if their children have symptoms consistent with influenza.

Schools play a vital role in the process to prevent disease within their communities. It is important to emphasize the importance of everyday actions that can help prevent the spread of germs that cause respiratory illnesses like influenza. Students, parents and faculty should take these everyday steps to protect their health:

  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it. Cover your nose and mouth with your sleeve if you do not have a tissue.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hand cleaners also are effective.
  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.

If you are sick, you should stay home and avoid contact with other people as much as possible to keep from spreading your illness to others.

If you become ill and experience any of the following warning signs, seek emergency medical care.

In children, emergency warning signs that need urgent medical attention include:

  • Fast breathing or trouble breathing
  • Bluish skin color
  • Not drinking enough fluids
  • Not waking up or not interacting
  • Being so irritable that the child does not want to be held
  • Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough
  • Fever with a rash

In adults, emergency warning signs that need urgent medical attention include:

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen
  • Sudden dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Severe or persistent vomiting

Institutions of Higher Education

CDC Guidance for Responses to Influenza for Institutions of Higher Education during the 2009-2010 Academic Year - CDC

Technical Report on CDC Guidance for Responses to Influenza for Institutions of Higher Education during the 2009-2010 Academic Year - CDC


Stopping the Spread of Germs at Home, Work and School - CDC

Seasonal Flu Information for Schools and Childcare Providers - CDC

Stopping Germs at Home, Work and School - CDC

 

 

Kids Vaccine Poster (CDC)

 



H1N1 Flu Vaccine Sites

Seasonal Influenza




Get info on H1N1 flu & more. Text 'Health' to 87000. www.flu.gov

Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS)

Flu View - A weekly influenza surveillance report


Illinois Department of Public Health | 535 West Jefferson Street | Springfield, Illinois 62761
Phone 217-782-4977 | Fax 217-782-3987 | TTY 800-547-0466