PRAMS - Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System
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Frequently Asked Questions:

What subject matter does PRAMS cover?

The PRAMS questionnaire consists of a core set of questions asked by all PRAMS participating states as well as state specific questions chosen by each state. About every four years, the survey undergoes a major revision process or phase. For specific content of Illinois surveys by year, see Illinois PRAMS Questionnaires. For specific content of the core component, see the U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Web site. Topic areas currently covered by PRAMS include:

  • Pregnancy intention
  • Prenatal care content and barriers to prenatal care
  • Folic acid awareness
  • Physical abuse to women by their husbands or partners
  • Risk factors, including selected medical conditions and major life stressors
  • Alcohol and tobacco use before and during pregnancy
  • Health insurance coverage
  • Infant health and care, including well baby visits, insurance coverage, sleep position
  • HIV testing
  • Assisted reproduction
  • Breastfeeding initiation, duration and barriers to breastfeeding
  • Birth control use before pregnancy
  • Depression counseling, diagnosis, treatment
  • Infant safety seat ownership and installation practices
  • Oral health care

Where can I find PRAMS publications?

Click on the Publications link of the Illinois PRAMS Web page to view current Illinois publications containing PRAMS data. Go the U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Web site to view multi-state PRAMS surveillance reports by year, special topics reports, fact sheets and reports published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR).

Can researchers access PRAMS data?

Requests by researchers for Illinois PRAMS data are reviewed on an individual basis. For more information about the request process, please send an inquiry to DPH.PRAMTRAC@illinois.gov. Requests for multi-state data should be directed to the U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).